Poem-A-Day

Poem-A-DayI’m on vacation this week so I’ve been writing a short post throughout this past week and scheduled it to publish this morning at 1000hrs EST. I hope you’ve all had a great week!

The homepage of the Academy of American Poets features a daily poem known as Poem-A-Day. The following description tells you everything you need to know about the program so I won’t belabor the point:

“Poem-a-Day is the original and only daily digital poetry series featuring over 200 new, previously unpublished poems by today’s talented poets each year. On weekdays, poems are accompanied by exclusive commentary by the poets. The series highlights classic poems on weekends. Launched in 2006, Poem-a-Day is now distributed via email, web, and social media to 350,000+ readers free of charge and is available for syndication. For more information about how to syndicate Poem-a-Day, contact poem-a-day@poets.org.”

I never knew the Academy published a book until I stumbled across this article. You can order the book directly from the Academy’s online store (recommended). You can also pick it up from several online retailers. The Academy’s website describes the book in a single, concise sentence:

“Inspired by Poem-a-Day—the original and only daily digital poetry series featuring over 200 new, previously unpublished poems by today’s talented poets each year with classic poems on the weekends—this new book includes poems by John Ashbery, Rita Dove, U.S. Poet Laureate Juan Felipe Herrera, and many more.”

The description on Amazon.com is surprisingly more in-depth, though I don’t necessarily think it needs to explain the entire contents of the book.

“For 80 years, the Academy of American Poets has been one of the most influential and respected champions of contemporary American poetry. Through their successful Poem-a-Day online program, the Academy continues to celebrate verse by delivering poems to thousands of e-mail subscribers each morning. Now for the first time, the poems selected by the Academy for this program are available in book form so that they can be collected and savored.

Loosely organized according to the flow and themes of the seasons (for example, the month of February includes poems on love, lust, and heartache), this substantial volume is designed to encourage the daily practice of reading poetry. A thematic index is included so that poems can be sought out for popular occasions such as marriage, graduation, and holidays, or enjoyed any day of the year.”

I plan on picking this book up soon! For now, the Poem-A-Day column has introduced me to an incredible amount of new poets and styles. It has also inspired several of my own poems whether emulating the featured poem, responding to it in “conversation”, or picking it apart.

Keep writing!

Cheers,

Bryan

 

The Poem as Comic Strip

Poetry Foundation

In mid-May, while researching articles and poems about Ted Kooser, the 13th U.S. Poet Laureate, I came across some beautiful and unique pieces on The Poetry Foundation’s website.

I will not copy the jpgs or pdfs directly to this site for copyright reasons. Rather, I’ll post a few links to the content on The Foundation’s website. This link takes you to the original six articles which began with “The Poem as Comic Strip” and ran for a series of six articles each with different authors, artists, and poets. Fred Sasaki published a seventh piece entitled, “Poem as Comic Strip Redux”, which followed three years after The Foundation published the sixth article.

The editors of The Poetry Foundation commissioned six artists to comb through their archives of poems in the public domain and create comic strips based on those pieces. If you haven’t visited the archives, I encourage you to do so. I have spent hours jumping from poem to poem, poet to poet in the website. I’m betting you’ll find more than you bargained for and forget to come up for air! Online poetry archives are the next best thing to brick-and-mortar bookstores and I find poetry rabbit-holing is the most rewarding!

The six artists chose the following poems, in order of their appearance: Diane Wakoski’s “Belly Dancer”, Emily Dickinson’s “It was not Death, for I Stood Up”, Russell Edson’s “Of Memory and Distance”, Kenneth Patchen’s “The Snow is Deep on the Ground”, Ted Kooser’s “The Giant Slide”, and A.E. Stallings’ “Recitative”. You can find text versions of each poem in The Foundation’s archive through a quick search to go along with the picture and review the poet’s original vision.

These poems as comic strips remind me of Billy Collins’ animated poetry which you can find on YouTube. This link will take you to a playlist of nine videos including “Walking Across the Atlantic”, “The Best Cigarette”, and “The Dead”, three of my favorite Collins poems and accompanying videos!

I’m not an artist, but this would make a great exercise for any poem that strikes you. I can also see, rather than a writing prompt, a drawing prompt come out of this.

As always keep writing (and drawing)!

Cheers,

Bryan

It’s Always Dark When I Put on My Lipstick

It’s Always Dark When I Put on My Lipstick

      For love of Stuart Dischell’s “She Put on Her Lipstick in the Dark”

Oui, I met a man in Paris once,
not the only man I’ve ever met
in Paris. It was in a museum
in a garden. I was looking

at the statues; getting a feel
for them with my fingers. Men
want to walk me to the café,
to the entrainer, and to the boutique.

They want me with coffee
and they want to help me
to cross several rues.
He sidled up to me, asking

which statue I favoured.
He said he would steal it for me;
just say the word. I told him
he needed a new line. I felt his

metal security guard badge
and his nightstick. I kissed him
anyway and leaned my head
on his warm chest. Paris was

cold and I wore my aquamarine
scarf. We sipped lovely cups
of coffee near loud machines.
I couldn’t see and I couldn’t

hear. I nearly missed my train,
Paris to Grenoble, seven hours
and 45 minutes. I never saw him
but I remember his face.

a better place to be or, she, part i

i lie in bed making snow angels
her sheets are white
like a frozen tundra

like a bridal gown
the assumption of purity
she loved the absurdity

im sprawled out
my left arm and leg hanging off the side

i woke up on the wrong side of this bed
the wrong side of the tracks with
the wrong girl

falling asleep and waking up
feeling trapped in some place
less exciting than
it was the night before

some nights i wish i had just stayed home
stayed up late
writing about girls
rather than putting up with them

she woke before i got up
i had been watching her
thinking of whirlpools
and tornados
but it’s my life
spiraling down

who is she
i wrote her name on my hand so
i wouldnt forget
but who is she

you can leave now she said
trying to salvage small self-respect

thanks for your permission i said
already headed toward the door

are you coming back she said

something’s got to give